Coach While Away From Your Athletes - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Jul 27, 2020 5 min read By sportsYou Success Team

Unable to regularly meet with your athletes over the summer? You can still significantly improve your athletes’ skills, conditioning, and strength while coaching/training remotely using sportsYou.

As we have witnessed over the past few months, coaches may not have the same opportunity to meet with their athletes to train, teach, and motivate as they used to. When unable to meet face-to-face with your athletes, here are some ideas on how you can implement these four strategies - motivation, workout plans, accountability, safety - to successfully improve the outcomes for each of your athletes.

1. Motivation

To keep athletes dedicated to the real work it takes to improve, it is crucial to effectively motivate.

“Each person holds so much power within themselves that needs to be let out. Sometimes they just need a little nudge, a little direction, a little support, a little coaching, and the greatest things can happen.”
Pete Carrol, Seattle Seahawks Head Football Coach

Each day, try to send a daily quote to your athletes that relates to their sport, position, role or goals. Quotes can come from famous people or may be something original by the coach.

A coach or athlete can also create a brief video - let’s say 10-30 seconds - and post it to the team feed to pump up your athletes. Other options include links to YouTube videos from an individual, game, or movie that gets your athletes motivated to do their strength and conditioning work, perfect their skills, and take care of their bodies.

How to use sportsYou to motivate.

  • Post a Color Text Post in the team feed with a daily motivational quote
  • Post a daily 10-30 second video to send a positive message
  • Select a different athlete each day to post a motivational quote and/or video
  • Post a video of different athletes working hard

2. Workout Plans

Want to get results out of your athletes? Provide a written plan for each athlete to follow.

“Failing to plan is planning to fail.”
John Wooden, Legendary UCLA Basketball Coach, 10 NCAA National Championships

Athletes look for guidance on what to do and how to do it. Use exact workout plans for your athletes to follow that includes: stretches, warmups, exercises, number of sets, number of reps, and a post-workout cool down.

Include the reasons for the workouts and the associated benefits that may include advances in skill, speed, strength, explosiveness, injury prevention and the like. Note that when things are written down, there is a significant increase in rates of completion - so create a specific daily workout plan and share it with your athletes in the team feed or attach to a Calendar event.

How to use sportsYou to share workout plans.

  • Post daily workouts in the team feed
  • Pin a weekly/monthly workout PDF to top of the team feed
  • Post a Color Text Post and/or a video to emphasize core workout goals e.g. increase explosiveness, improve lateral quickness
  • Attach workout PDFs to Calendar dates with notifications

3. Accountability

To hold athletes accountable, provide pathways to record their work.

“A lot of people want to win, but they won’t do what it takes. When your best players are your hardest workers, you have the chance to be very good.”
Tara VanDerveer, Stanford Women’s Head Basketball Coach, 1,042 wins, Naismith Hall of Fame

Coaches want to know that their athletes completed their workouts - and athletes need to share that they completed their workouts. Using sportsYou, players can inform their coach on whether they completed their workout for that day by simply checking a “Yes” or “No” answer on a Poll in the team feed. This way, coaches know who is getting things done, and who is not.

And for those not doing their workouts, the coach can have a conversation via Chat to find out how to help their athletes move forward.

How to use sportsYou for accountability.

  • Post a daily Poll with “Yes” or “No” answers on whether the workout was completed
  • Have athletes send the coach a Chat with a 10 second video of them during or after completing workout
  • Have athletes send the coach a Chat with words such as “Falcon Pride”, “Stronger”, “Faster”, “Dedication”, “More Skilled”, “Perseverance”, etc. to signify completion

4. Safety

Keeping athletes safe and healthy requires education.

“When you teach an athlete how to take care of their body, it leads to improved health and a better performance.”
Jim Gossett, Columbia Lions Head Trainer

Convey knowledge to your athletes that teaches them how to safely train in order to prevent injuries. Teach training techniques, stretching methods, rest requirements, and good nutritional practices that all combine to prevent injuries while maximizing successful outcomes.

Communicate with your athletes to provide balanced workouts so that there are not different trainers/coaches requiring athletes to complete multiple workouts that leads to overuse and potential injuries.

How to use sportsYou for safety and health.

  • Post documents with safe training practices related to physical and nutritional topics
  • Post a daily Color Text Post with nutritional tips
  • Post daily videos on proper techniques related to running, bodyweight exercises, lifting, and stretching
  • Create Calendar events to remind athletes to eat healthy and hydrate while training

Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
Color Text Posts and Animated GIFs: Try Out These New Features Today - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Dec 16, 2019 2 min read By The sportsYou Team

There’s some fun, new ways to express yourself on sportsYou: presenting Color Text Posts and Animated GIFs - two new features now available on the sportsYou app and the sportsYou.com website.

Color Text Posts 👨‍🎨

Add some personality to your messages and give your posts a vibrant background color with Color Text Posts. Pick a color to show for your mood or show your team color. Your posts will stand out on the feed with an exciting background color.

Give your posts a background color with Color Text Posts on sportsYou.

How to Create a Color Text Post

On your personal, team or group feed, create a new post by tapping the “What are you up to?” field. Then tap on the “Color Text Post” button. Next, you can choose from the list of colors to set that color as the background for your post. Then type your message and post it. Now you have a post that pops!

Animated GIFs 😺

After a big win or a tough practice, sometimes the best way to express those feelings with the team is with something visual. Now you can send Animated GIFs in your chat messages and posts to get the team pumped, laughing, and communicating. This is one of the most requested features and it’s now live on sportsYou for everyone. Get your posts and your team moving and share some Animated GIFs today!

Add some motion to your posts and chat with Animated GIFs on sportsYou.

How to Add an Animated GIF

On your personal, team or group feed, create a new post by tapping the “What are you up to?” field. Next, select the camera icon to browse your photos on your mobile device or computer. Choose an Animated GIF and you can share it like any photo on sportsYou.

You can send an Animated GIF as a chat message also. In any chat, you can now select the camera icon to browse your photos and select Animated GIFs to send in the chat.

Try These New Features Out Today

When you want to make your message stand out, express yourself with these new, easy-to-use features now available on the sportsYou app and the sportsYou.com website.

You and your team or group can download the sportsYou app for free from the Apple App Store and Google Play.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
sportsYou Coach Spotlight: Q&A with Coach Rob Moloney - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Nov 15, 2019 5 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

CrossFit coach and sportsYou user, Rob Moloney, takes his job very seriously and it shows. After starting his career as a CrossFit coach in 2013, he worked his way up to owning the Island Park, New York CrossFit gym in 2017. He got there through hard work and integrity – those are qualities he aims to instill in his members. sportsYou had the chance to chat with him about how he got started with CrossFit and his struggles and achievements along the way.

sportsYou: Can you tell me a bit about CrossFit and your gym?

Rob Moloney: Every CrossFit is under the same name but everyone has their own unique identity. Ours has come from what I believe in as a person, as an athlete and as a professional. Our slogan is “in pursuit of excellence” and that is what we are always striving to do. Most of that is done through integrity. We always are looking to do things the right way. That means keeping the integrity of the movements that we do, so we’re not just trying to get by cheating our way through things. Everything we do is with the intent of longevity. We want to be able to be as fit as possible for as long as possible. We’re not training to be the professional athletes of the world. That is not a job that is attainable for most nor can it last – as you see in professional sports careers. Very few people last 20 years or so. We’re looking to get the majority of the community to be fit both physically and mentally as well as to create better habits. Then the goal is to keep those habits. Our classes are designed with a lot of preparation and intent so that it puts everybody in the safest position as well as sets everybody up for as much success as possible.

sportsYou: What inspired you to coach CrossFit?

RM: I began coaching CrossFit in 2013, but I began CrossFit about six months before that. Prior to that, I was doing my own thing in a regular gym and making up my own workouts. I had a couple clients I would do some personal training with. A CrossFit opened up in my neighborhood where I was living in Brooklyn and I decided to try it. I said I would try for a month and then after that, if I didn’t like it I’d go back to doing what I was doing. It turned out I was not good at everything and the competitor in me wanted to keep going. While I was starting, I had an interest in coaching because I enjoyed being around fitness. I wasn’t enjoying my desk job because I didn’t want to sit down all day and I wasn’t passionate about it. I began part time coaching until a full-time position opened up. That’s when I made my decision I was going to quit my desk job and go with the unorthodox work schedule – wake up at 4:30 or 5 in the morning and then maybe not get home until 9:30 or 10 at night.

Coach Rob Moloney

sportsYou: Can you talk about what why you started using the sportsYou app and what you use it for?

RM: Harrison Hefele, an employee at sportsYou, is a member and friend at the gym and he introduced my business partner and I to the app and gave us a rundown of how it works. As he was going through, sportsYou looked easy to use and it pulled the necessary things that I would need away from Facebook. I figured I would try it with a small group to see if it worked and then go from there. We have a weightlifting program that had about a dozen people in it. I had everybody log in and join a group. We still use it 2 years later for the same reasons. It’s great because everyone can post videos of them lifting and the coach can comment on it to give feedback. I also use the app for my whole coaching staff in the same respects as that weightlifting group. I post demo videos for them, so they know what new movements are coming up. I haven’t opened it up to the whole gym because it’s very difficult to move about 200 people in a different direction. But my plan is to try to do that because the only thing I use Facebook for is a group for the members.

Coach Rob Moloney

sportsYou: What would you say are some of the biggest challenges that you face as a coach?

RM: One of the biggest challenges is staffing the gym with employees who have the same mindset that I have. That means getting a staff on the same page and on board with the focus and direction that myself and my business partner have for the gym in the long run. There are a lot of people just looking to get a coaching job but they’re not looking to necessarily learn more, coach more and put in the necessary hours. They’re just looking for a way to get paid.

sportsYou: What would you say is your greatest achievement as a coach so far?

RM: Owning my own gym, hands down. This took four years since being a full-time coach in the fitness industry. It didn’t hit me until almost a year into being an owner that I had actually accomplished this goal. One piece of advice I got from a good friend and mentor when I started coaching was to treat the place like you own it and one day you will. My plan was that if I wasn’t able to make a living off this in five years then I would re-evaluate if I would continue making it my full-time effort. With a great support system, I am happy to say that things are continuing to go in the right direction.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
New Feature: Pin a Post 📌 - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Oct 8, 2019 2 min read By The sportsYou Team

Now you can keep an important post always pinned to the top of your team/group feed to save everyone time! 

Keep your website link, schedule, important documents, polls, announcements, and motivational posts easy to reach by pinning a post on the feed!

Team and group admins can “pin” a post from the team/group feed to stay always at the top. A pinned post appears before all other posts on the feed for all members of the team/group. The post stays pinned until you pin a different post or unpin the post.

New sportsYou Feature: Pin a post to the top of the feed

How to Use Pinned Posts

If you are an admin of a team or group you can pin a post on your team/group feed. On a team or group feed, scroll to the post you would like to keep at the top of the feed.

Next, select the more options button (the three dots) in the top right of the post.

Then from the menu, choose “Pin to Team/Group Page” and confirm. The post will now stay at the top of feed until you pin a different post!

Try This New Feature Out Today

When you have information that your team or group needs to see first, try out this new easy-to-use feature now available on the sportsYou app and the sportsYou.com website.

You and your team or group can download the sportsYou app for free from the Apple App Store and Google Play.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
sportsYou Coach Spotlight: Q&A with Coach Alex Latorre - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Sep 12, 2019 3 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

Coach Alex Latorre was born and raised in Brazil as part of a missionary family. “Soccer is basically a religion down there, so it was in the blood,” he remarked.

Alex moved to America to attend high school as well as college and continued to pursue his passion for soccer. Remarkably, he was drafted as a college sophomore to play soccer professionally for a year.

After completing his degree, Alex received a call to coach at York College in Nebraska. He’s been the head of the men’s soccer program for the past three years and is set to take over the women’s soccer program this year.

The men’s soccer team has flourished under his leadership. Last year, they achieved their first winning season in 15 years and defeated a team they haven’t beaten in 11 years.

sportsYou: What would you say are your greatest challenges as a coach?

Alex Latorre: Communication is the main thing. We used to use WhatsApp to communicate but the one thing that bothered me was that when I made a comment and somebody made a comment back, it pushed mine up high and some players would miss it.

I was trying to find something that was kind of like Facebook in that you post something and they can make a comment under my post, so it doesn’t get pushed up and disappear. I was also looking for something that would let me communicate better with my players. That’s how I got started using sportsYou.

“Communication is the main thing.”

I just took over the women’s team and the one thing they like is how organized it is. A big part of that is the sportsYou calendar. I can post everything on the calendar, so they don’t have to ask a thousand questions because it’s all on there.

sportsYou: How do you communicate with your players to help them improve year to year?

AL: One thing I really believe in is building a relationship with the players and having a culture within the program. By building that relationship, it creates opportunities to sit down with a player and tell them how they can improve and get better. I have that respect from them because I built that relationship.

We obviously practice and do a lot of drills but it really comes down to being on the same page. We do classroom meetings and go over soccer tactics and my expectations. It all comes down to communication and being upfront about my expectations for each player so, they’re not shocked when something happens.

Coach Alex Latorre's players in action

sportsYou: What’s the number one quality you look for in a player?

AL: The number one thing I’m looking for is character. During the recruiting process, I ask the player questions to see if they’ll fit in the program. I have a philosophy called P.H.D., which is positive attitude, hard work and discipline.

“I have a philosophy called P.H.D., which is positive attitude, hard work and discipline.”

I feel like if you have those three things in your character, you can only get better. It doesn’t matter if you’re the worst or the best player because if you have those qualities there is only always going to be room for improvement.

sportsYou: Do you have any advice for young coaches?

AL: It’s not always about wins and losses. What matters the most are the relationships and building character because that is what’s going to last forever.

If you work on those things, you will start winning. I proved that in my first year as a head coach. Every year we were breaking records in my school. That is what I would recommend for new coaches coming in.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
How a superintendent decided to use sportsYou - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Aug 19, 2019 3 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

About three years ago, the superintendent of instruction and technology for the Bethpage Union Free School District (BUFSD) in New York met with the athletic director to discuss a new communication app that was generating buzz at other schools in the county. After thoroughly evaluating the sportsYou app, they decided it was the right fit for their sports teams.

“I’ve been exposed to a lot of different apps that have these types of programs and procedures and hadn’t signed on to any of them because they had fallen short, in my view as a coach, in a couple of the areas that I needed fulfilled,” said David Schneider, the former superintendent of instruction and technology and current superintendent of the district.

sportsYou was the first app that truly convinced David to establish an app as the main vehicle for coaches in his district to communicate with players and their family. David also uses the sportsYou app as a coach for the Syosset Soccer Club.

“It was the most comprehensive app”

BUFSD heavily utilizes Google services in their district, so sportsYou’s integration with Google sign-in and its ability to attach documents was a major selling point. There was no easy way to upload links and documents with the other apps.

Schneider uses sportsYou to have parents fill out Google surveys, which are then directly imported into his Google drive. He also likes the connection between the sportsYou calendar and his personal iPhone calendar.

“It was the most comprehensive app,” he said. “There would just always seem to be plenty of holes in each of the other apps that I was exposed to prior.”

Before smartphones and apps were commonplace, coaches communicated with their teams via email. But the obvious drawback with email is that people don’t always check their inbox.

“It’s so much easier than using email because with email you don’t have push notifications”

“It’s so much easier than using email because with email you don’t have push notifications,” said Schneider. “The expectation on response time is now far longer for email than it is for any sort of text message.”

He added that having different ways to manage notifications when he posts on the feed and sends chat messages allows for very consistent communication back and forth.

Schneider likes that sportsYou as a company is open and responsive to feedback. The R&D team was quick to listen to his needs and work toward improving the app.

“In our first season they assisted entering in the scheduling of all of the games and that eased the perceived burden,” he said. “It’s really easy to use but everybody was afraid of how much work it was going to be, and these are volunteers that are doing this work.” Quickly Schneider and his teams found that it was easy and that the sportsYou app became a natural compliment to their team communication and management workflows.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
sportsYou Coach Spotlight: Q&A with Coach David Schneider - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Aug 2, 2019 5 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

David Schneider is the national staff instructor for United Soccer Coaches and the superintendent of schools for the Bethpage Union Free School District. But David still finds time to be a coach for the Syosset Soccer Club.

Before that, David was head of the Long Island Junior Soccer League for 11 years. He also spent a few years in the pool of players for the U.S. national Olympic team and played a few years in the Northeast Professional Soccer League.

David is big on inspiring his players to give their maximum effort and fostering a sense of team camaraderie. sportsYou had a chance to speak with him about the different strategies he deploys to accomplish that.

sportsYou: What are the main challenges you face as a coach?

David Schneider: The challenges as a coach is to continue to find ways to get your players to give you their maximum effort each time you’re with them. The hope is that if you accomplish that, it will then also translate into them giving their maximum effort when they’re not with you. Especially if you ask them to do things off the field outside of your normal practice and training time.

With sportsYou I’m able to post things that become resources for the players on an easy-access platform. Whether it’s simple things like a workout or other things that aren’t so simple like a reflective assignment, they all go to this one place and get it there.

sportsYou: Are there any strategies that you deploy from year to year to help your players improve?

DS: The most important thing isn’t a strategy because strategy has its limitations. It’s more about culture. We build a culture of learning and improvement, which is the replacement for a culture of winning. The kids have so many more years ahead of them if they choose, so it’s important to have that positive culture of learning and wanting to improve and get better each and every day.

We build a culture of learning and improvement, which is the replacement for a culture of winning.

There are some strategies that we use to do that and much of that is how I handle relationships that we build with the players and their families and the relationships that we help the players build with each other. The challenge with soccer, especially on Long Island is that it’s very, very easy for you to think that the grass is greener elsewhere.

The player movement problem is incredibly high on Long Island, yet I’ve been able to maintain all of these players since a very young age. The only times that I lose players are when they’ve decided that they no longer want to compete at this level and make that level of commitment. They step away from the game, which is in essence a failure of mine too, but it’s more because of the choice between soccer and other things. It’s because they have to focus on their grades or can only play the one sport and hockey is the bigger sport for them or something like that. But that has happened with only two or three players out of my many years coaching.

sportsYou: Could you give examples of ways that you try to foster camaraderie among your teams?

DS: We’re playing a lot of smaller games of which the groupings are constantly being changed, so there isn’t going to be a group of players that stand out differently than any other group of players. We’re always doing things where the players have to rely on one another. The activities don’t allow one person to be able to run the show and stand out on their own. Soccer is very heavily dependent on teamwork to be successful.

Also, in any moment of failure such as a missed kickball or misplaced pass, the manner in which we speak to each other and the language that we use is very important. I work very hard to instill a sense of growth mindset in our players. That’s the belief that talent is something that can be developed and not something you’re born with. You start with the idea that when someone says they can’t do it, your response is you can’t do it yet and if you keep working on it then you can get there.

The feedback loop that we provide our players is very important and it’s the same kind that I expect of my teaching staff here as the superintendent of schools.

The feedback loop that we provide our players is very important and it’s the same kind that I expect of my teaching staff here as the superintendent of schools. The type of feedback and language that you’re using when things don’t go perfectly, as they don’t so often in sports, is very important.

You can have a higher level of expectation without being demeaning and you can speak in a productive way to provide good feedback so that they can learn from their mistakes and not get discouraged by them. This helps the players stay motivated to continue to work towards progressing to get better.

sportsYou: Is there any advice that you would give to soccer coaches who are just starting out in the field?

DS: The most important thing you tell anybody who is working with kids is that if you think about three words that describe your favorite coach or teacher, I guarantee you that those words are going to deal with the way in which that person treated you. They could be kind, nice, funny, respectful or demanding.

None of those words are going to have anything to do with knowing the ins and outs of your sport or of your content. It’s all going to be about the manner in which you treat people. The real power of being a good coach and teacher is not how well you understand the ins and outs of the skills of the sport. That stuff is easier to learn and connecting with kids is much harder to learn.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
sportsYou Coach Spotlight: Q&A with Coach Julianne Tierney - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Jul 19, 2019 5 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

Julianne Tierney has a lot on her plate. She is a special education teacher and the high school softball, volleyball and basketball coach for the Bethpage Union Free School District in Bethpage, NY.

You can tell from the enthusiasm in her voice that she loves her job as a coach and takes it very seriously. Team bonding is something she is especially passionate about.

She took some time to speak with sportsYou about how she fosters those bonds and other ways she sets her teams up for success.

sportsYou: If you could pick one thing, what would you say was the highlight of your career as a coach so far?

Julianne Tierney: When we had a 13-inning game at our Autism Awareness softball game last year against East Rockaway. It was a big fundraiser game and we played an awesome game. That was one of the best moments so far.

One of my students threw out the first pitch at the beginning of the game and the girls wore light blue jerseys. The game went into extra innings because we were tied the whole game but we won with a walk-off.

sportsYou: What would you say are your greatest challenges as a coach?

JT: It’s mostly things that go on off the field like the relationships between the girls. You want to create that family environment. It’s not something that’s necessarily hard to do but it’s something that takes work. You have to create team-bonding experiences and things like that.

“You want to create that family environment. It’s not something that’s necessarily hard to do but it’s something that takes work.”

In all three seasons, we do a lot of team bonding days where we play team-building games and we talk about things that don’t always pertain to the sport to grow individuals as people. For softball this year, we went on a trip as a team to Disney and that was such a great experience for everybody.

You don’t really have a lot of time as a high school coach. Every day, you only have about two hours of practice but it takes a lot of extra time to do the team-building things and to make sure that they’re having a good experience with that.

I think that to be successful on the field or on the court, you have to have that team camaraderie. You have to trust the person next to you. I think that comes first before anything that goes on out on the field.

Coach Julianne Tierney

sportsYou: What made you decide to use the sportsYou app to communicate with your teams?

JT: At the beginning of my coaching career, I used TeamSnap a little bit but the sportsYou interface is a lot better. sportsYou is easier to use and it’s easier for kids to sign up for. The other app didn’t have push notifications but with this app, when you get a message it’s like getting a text message instead of an email.

I really like that you can invite the family members so everybody can see anything that gets posted. I put all pictures on there as well as the schedule. You’re able to chat with individual parents or team members. It eliminates any issues with contacting them through a personal phone.

I also like how you could see who viewed each post. You’re able to see which girls have seen it and which girls have not seen it. The app also makes an album of all the things that went on during the seasons. It allows everybody to be on the same page.

My players definitely like using it but in the beginning, it was a little bit of a transition for them. For softball and basketball this year, we used sportsYou for everything.

Coach Julianne Tierney

sportsYou: Do you have any strategies to help any of your softball, volleyball or basketball players improve from year to year?

JT: As a coach, you have to invest in the individual player as well as the team. Everybody has their own set of skills and I think it’s important to work on team building and team strategy as a whole but to also invest in players as individuals.

“I know how to teach kids skills but the trust factor is really important. As soon as they trust you then they’re able to learn from you.”

Trust is also a factor. I have a lot of experience because I played volleyball and softball in college. I know how to teach kids skills but the trust factor is really important. As soon as they trust you then they’re able to learn from you.

sportsYou: Is there anybody who inspired you in your career as a coach?

JT: I had a lot of great coaches. I actually coach now with one of the coaches that I had. But I would say that my dad was the best coach I ever had. I always wanted to be a coach like he was. He wasn’t a high school coach but he was always my coach and I learned a lot from him as I was growing up. He was a big supporter at all my games in high school and college.

sportsYou: Do you have any advice for new coaches?

JT: I think it’s important to control what you can control and not get worked up over the small things. It’s a lot more than sports because you want to teach them to be good people. I knew that going into coaching.

You have to remember as a new coach that coaching and playing are very different. Sometimes they’re not always going to be able to do the things that you did when you were at your best. You need to invest in their development. You have to teach and build their skills so they can get to that level.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
How one coach kept in touch with his team while overseas caring for his sick son - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Jul 12, 2019 3 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

On February 15th, Jim DeLine got a call in the middle of his fourth-grade physical education class that his son contracted sepsis while on vacation in the Philippines.

By the time he was transferred to Beijing, the infection spread and he went into septic shock. His blood pressure was 6040, heart rate was 150 and temperature was 104. The doctors were hoping to save his leg but were unsure if he was even going to live.

The doctors were hoping to save his leg but were unsure if he was even going to live.

Like any father, DeLine dropped everything and traveled to be with his son. He was in the middle of the archery season and six weeks from the state tournament but that was all going to have to wait.

“The first call I got is that I needed to get there,” he said. “It started out as a 10-day trip and ended up being 14 or 15 days.”

DeLine was under an immense amount of stress but he didn’t have to worry about his archery team back home. His assistant coach and the parents took the reins and kept in touch with him via the sportsYou app.

“They sent photos, videos and inspirational private chat messages on sportsYou,” he said. “sportsYou was a great place to keep the community together for community-specific needs.”

“sportsYou was a great place to keep the community together for community-specific needs.”

His son made it through that life-threatening ordeal but is currently having some issues with his other leg because he has been compensating so much for the affected leg. DeLine noted that he’s, “not totally out of the woods but he’s physically safe.”

Coach Jim DeLine is a physical education teacher and archery coach at Highland Park Elementary School in Austin, Texas. DeLine first started using the sportsYou app in January of this year. Prior to that, he tried another app but found it to be too complicated to set up. “One of my biggest pet peeves is when I learned the interface on one device then when I use it on another device, I have to relearn it because everything looks different.” said DeLine. “The sportsYou interface on the phone is super user-friendly and the interface on the phone and on the computer don’t vary too much.”

In the beginning, DeLine faced a challenge to get the players and their parents to migrate over to the sportsYou app. He overcame that by continuously referring them to sportsYou when they ask for information such as practices and games which is found on the sportsYou calendar.

He is an administrator for his team on sportsYou and is able to see what his high school team posts. DeLine noticed that the high school players are very effective communicators using sportsYou.

“I get to see their chats and it’s really cool,” said DeLine. “They talk about meeting each other for lunch and remind each other about yearbook pictures. It’s great to see them banter and be teammates.”


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
sportsYou Coach Spotlight: Q&A with Coach Jim DeLine - Photo by sportsYou Photography
Jun 26, 2019 6 min read By Lauren Dubinsky

Jim DeLine is a physical education teacher and archery coach at Highland Park Elementary School in Austin, Texas. His team won back-to-back state championships and recently finished fourth at Nationals out of 200 teams in Louisville, Kentucky.

When he isn’t busy with his team, he coaches high school archery and helps out with the middle school team. sportsYou had an interesting chat with Jim about this fascinating sport and the positive impact it can have on youngsters.

sportsYou: How did you get your team prepared for the state championships?

Jim DeLine: We try to do what every other coach does by trying to make sure that they practice regularly and they’re mentally prepared. For our particular fifth graders, this was the biggest tournament that they will have gone to. We’ve gone to small tournaments but this was held in a huge venue with over a hundred targets.

The kids were shooting 200 at a time. We try to get them prepared so that they go in with a mindset that they can handle any challenge and that nothing’s going to surprise them. But if there is a challenge that they’re surprised about then we want them to be prepared for the unexpected.

For fifth graders in a sport that’s so intensely mental, we try to help them get their brains wrapped around what the competition is going to be like. It is a big part of what we do. Other than that, we practice. In between actual practices they practice at home by using something called a string bow, which is a training implement that helps develop muscle memory.

sportsYou: How was archery introduced to your school district?

JD: We’ve had archery in our curriculum since 2012 but we’ve been coaching it for the last three years. We had a club and a little intramural squad with a tournament but we started the team in 2017.

It started through the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP). They have a two-pronged approach. One is to get archery in the schools and teach kids about it and the other involves a very vibrant competitive arm. There are tournaments all over the country leading up to state tournaments and then leading up to the national tournament in May.

In order to compete at any of these tournaments, your school has to document that you’re actually teaching archery as part of the regular physical education or agricultural science curriculum. You have to check that box off first before you can actually go and compete.

What’s very cool about this particular sport is that it checks off every differentiation, cultural diversity, social/emotional learning and gender equity box. It checks off every box that we have in education that we’re trying to bring to kids to impact and change lives. Teams need to have boys and girls on them and team scores have to include boys and girls scores on them.

You don’t have to be the strongest, the fastest or the tallest to be able to be successful.

You don’t have to be the strongest, the fastest or the tallest to be able to be successful. Every year we have two or three athletic stud boys that think that they can do anything because God gave them the talent to run and jump. Then you’ll have a girl who is just 65 pounds wet who learns to shoot an arrow better than them. It’s because she understands that she’s got to wrap her brain around technique and form and how to use the muscles the right way.

sportsYou: What is your greatest achievement as a coach?

JD: Last year, we had 10 kids on the high school team. One of them had Down syndrome, two of them had different degrees of autism and one boy was recovering from brain cancer. He’s a senior now and this was the first time that he could stand up since he was a freshman. We also had a kid that I thought was a heavy metal rocker but turned out to be the first chair cello in the entire region.

All of these kids came together and were absolutely horrible at archery. They’re still not great shooters but they had fun and we did qualify for state championships. My daughter was there the entire day rooting on her teammates. My proudest moment was seeing her take charge of her team and doing it in a graceful way.

Another proud moment was watching my daughter shoot a perfect 50 at 15 meters. A perfect 50 is about the size of a coffee cup and you have to put five arrows in that space at 15 meters.

sportsYou: What challenges do you face as a coach?

JD: Time is always a challenge and also perception. Every year we seem to have parents that question what we do and why we do it. One of our policies is that we don’t cut kids. We’ll figure out a way to pay for the things that need to be paid for like jerseys, permit fees and bus costs if we travel somewhere. We fundraise and have scholarships.

We always have to be mindful that we are putting forth a positive perception that this is an extracurricular part of our entire school. It’s wonderful and offers kids great things across the board but we also need to make sure that people understand why we do it.

We always go back and reflect on our core values, which are to keep the kids safe, help them grow and teach them to win.

We always go back and reflect on our core values, which are to keep the kids safe, help them grow and teach them to win. Sometimes people just see bows and arrows and they don’t really see the depth of what’s going on and how it impacts kids on levels that I don’t think they get impacted on in other programs.

sportsYou: What advice would you give new coaches of any sport?

JD: Kids first — plain and simple. The bottom line is it’s supposed to be fun and we want to teach kids values. For example, we tell them, ‘the dream is free but the work costs extra.’ We want to teach kids things that they can do to set goals.

You need to be ridiculously faithful to the little things and understand what you can or cannot control. All those things are wrapped around any sport. They’re also wrapped around life. The bottom line is that we want to keep kids safe, we want to help them grow and then teach them how to win.

How we define winning isn’t necessarily state championships.

How we define winning isn’t necessarily state championships. That’s great and that should be a goal but we want them to think about whether they shoot a personal best, helped a teammate, were professional, used manners and represented our school well. Those are all things that you can check off as wins.


Ready to learn more about how to smartly and easily manage your team? Now you can connect coaches, players, and families on one app.

Get started with sportsYou, the FREE Team Communication App, at sportsYou.com or in the app stores and set up your team or group in under 60 seconds.
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